Why brand interactions are kind of like The Avengers

In the Avengers comics, several superheroes have to team up to beat a single, super-powerful bad guy.

It’s the same with brand interactions: It takes a lot of positives to overcome a negative.

Bad experiences are powerful. They stick with us. We won’t explore the complex reasons for this here, but the fact is, a single negative can wipe out all the positives that came before it. Any positives that might follow had better be pretty heroic – or the customer/brand relationship is doomed.

A quick story illustrates this:

For months I’d been receiving direct mail flyers from a digital services provider. Bit by bit, their beautifully designed and well-written mailers convinced me I should bundle my Internet, phone and TV service into one product they provide.

My wife and I drove to one of the brand’s retail stores to sign up. The store was new, well laid out, and fun to look around in. We started getting excited about how cool it was going to be to have the service.

But all the positivity building up was about to get knocked out cold by a single negative: The guy signing us up for the service wasn’t knowledgeable.

Maybe he was new, but that doesn’t matter. When we asked a question – whether it was about a promotional discount, options or installation – he either didn’t know or looked very uncertain as he flailed at an answer. (I’ve seen deer about to be flattened by semis that looked more relaxed.)

His lack of preparedness gradually unnerved us and made us question if we were doing the right thing. (At one point during the excruciating process we almost said forget it.)

In the end we ordered the service, but with the caveat that we could cancel the order prior to the installation date. We drove home agitated and confused, leaning towards canceling.

Fortunately for this brand, however, all was not lost. It was about to be rescued by the extraordinary technical support person I called when I got home. She was a marvel. She had answers. She had energy. She took ownership of my problems and solved them. In the end I was so impressed I had her get her supervisor on the phone so I could rave. I wouldn’t be surprised if she wears a cape and tights to work; she was that good.

But here’s the bottom line: Had she not used all her powers to overcome the damage done by the store experience, a customer would have been lost.

So let’s remember that every brand interaction counts. Your agency can produce award-winning work for you, but that’s only part of brand-building. The follow-through has to happen at every touchpoint.

 

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